National Review: The ‘Shelter in Place’ Plan Is Not Enough

  • August 7, 2021

The ‘shelter-in-place’ plan is not enough to ensure the safety of the tens of thousands of people who have already fled the floodwaters, warns National Review contributor Tim Gionet. 

The plan, announced in May by Secretary of State John Kerry, is supposed to provide an “expedited” process for the federal government to “resettle” people who live in flood-prone areas. 

But in an opinion piece for the National Review, Gionett argues the plan is a failure, and he urges President Trump to immediately halt the plan. 

“I hope that by the end of this week, the president and his administration will stop the sanctuary-in place plan that the government has just announced,” Gionets opines. 

Gionet says the federal program is an overreach, and calls it a “scam” that will be “put in place to try to protect the taxpayers of the United States from future disasters.” 

He writes that the plan should not be used to “assist in the mass evacuation of citizens in flood prone areas of Texas, Louisiana, and New Orleans.” 

Gions plan calls for “resettlement of people with a criminal record and other criminal records that have been found to pose a threat to public safety, including those that are considered at high risk of becoming violent offenders.” 

But Gionette is not alone in his concerns. 

A bipartisan group of lawmakers, led by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, has introduced a bill that would “defund the president’s plan to resettle immigrants who live, work, or study in flood zones and who have been charged with a crime, including domestic violence, sexual assault, robbery, or kidnapping.” 

“The legislation would provide $1 billion in relief to the states and cities that will provide financial assistance to flood victims and their families,” the group said in a statement to The Huffington Post. 

This isn’t the first time that the White House has proposed to help those displaced by the flooding, as the president recently offered $1 million to the city of Austin to help flood victims relocate to the U.S. from the region. 

However, the bill has faced opposition from the states of Texas and Louisiana, who argue that it will be too expensive for them to provide the funding. 

In addition to the Texas bill, Schumer and his co-sponsors are also seeking to amend the Flood Disaster Relief Act of 2017 to include $1.5 billion for “disaster assistance to state and local governments.” 

Schumer has also called on Congress to pass legislation that would fund $100 million for the Texas Flood Relief Act. 

Meanwhile, Texas Gov.

Greg Abbott has also proposed a “shelters in place” plan, which he said is a “better option than the federal plan.” 

However the National Park Service has already announced that the National Flood Insurance Program will not be available until June 25, 2019, and has warned that it “will not cover all needs.” 

Read the full National Review article on The Huffington